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Placing a special focus on at-risk species and wildlands, Zoe Keller weaves drawings that explore the interconnectedness of fragile, vanishing ecosystems. By highlighting the biodiversity at risk in an era of human-driven mass extinction their work aims to inspire reverence for the natural world and action to defend what we have left. Keller's studio work draws upon months of research, collaborations with the scientific community, and on-the-ground experiences in wild places through artist residencies and self-directed expeditions.

This piece is part of Zoe's ETA #32 collection. There are over 1,400 described species of moths belonging to the family Saturniidae found across the globe. Saturniid moths can have bright colors, spectacular, defensive eye-spot patterns and impressive wingspans; the Atlas moth is one of the largest moths in the world, and the Cecropia moth is the largest in North America. Each drawing in this series features a Saturniid moth, one of its host plants, and stages of its life cycle from minute egg to brilliant adult. 

Sale

Pine Tree Emperor Moth

Regular price $ 400.00 $ 300.00Sale
Unit price
per 
made by hand
one of a kind
original art

Medium: Graphite on paper

DImensions: 8"x10"
Framed: 9.125"x11.125"

Framed

Portland, Maine, USA

woman artist

Placing a special focus on at-risk species and wildlands, Zoe Keller weaves drawings that explore the interconnectedness of fragile, vanishing ecosystems. By highlighting the biodiversity at risk in an era of human-driven mass extinction their work aims to inspire reverence for the natural world and action to defend what we have left. Keller's studio work draws upon months of research, collaborations with the scientific community, and on-the-ground experiences in wild places through artist residencies and self-directed expeditions.

This piece is part of Zoe's ETA #32 collection. There are over 1,400 described species of moths belonging to the family Saturniidae found across the globe. Saturniid moths can have bright colors, spectacular, defensive eye-spot patterns and impressive wingspans; the Atlas moth is one of the largest moths in the world, and the Cecropia moth is the largest in North America. Each drawing in this series features a Saturniid moth, one of its host plants, and stages of its life cycle from minute egg to brilliant adult.