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Sarah Moore’s work explores the idea that nature is not a place we go, but a relationship we inhabit. Her paintings document how, through paying deep attention, a landscape expands from a flat scene into an ecology of meaningful lives which inherently include our own. 

In Sarah's words: "After I moved last year from the Appalachian foothills of eastern Tennessee to San Antonio, Texas, I was surprised at how memories of the landscapes I had spent years painting on the east coast would come back to me suddenly. Standing in the arid heat next to a prickly pear cactus, I could close my eyes and step into a foggy morning, surrounded by moss and towering trees. It wasn’t until I moved that I realized how deeply those places and plants had burrowed themselves into my psyche, becoming an intrinsic part of my identity. At first I felt uprooted and pruned, as if I’d left behind not just my home, but parts of myself, too. The paintings in Familiar Haunts are portraits of the places where those parts of myself still dwell. In making this body of work, I was able to process the longing I felt for what I left behind and create space for a sense of groundedness in new soil."

September Fog

Regular price $ 1,800.00
Unit price
per 

Medium: Acrylic on linen

Dimensions: 24"x18"
Framed: 25"x19"

Douglas Fir Frame

Texas, USA

woman artist
made by hand
one of a kind
original art

Sarah Moore’s work explores the idea that nature is not a place we go, but a relationship we inhabit. Her paintings document how, through paying deep attention, a landscape expands from a flat scene into an ecology of meaningful lives which inherently include our own. 

In Sarah's words: "After I moved last year from the Appalachian foothills of eastern Tennessee to San Antonio, Texas, I was surprised at how memories of the landscapes I had spent years painting on the east coast would come back to me suddenly. Standing in the arid heat next to a prickly pear cactus, I could close my eyes and step into a foggy morning, surrounded by moss and towering trees. It wasn’t until I moved that I realized how deeply those places and plants had burrowed themselves into my psyche, becoming an intrinsic part of my identity. At first I felt uprooted and pruned, as if I’d left behind not just my home, but parts of myself, too. The paintings in Familiar Haunts are portraits of the places where those parts of myself still dwell. In making this body of work, I was able to process the longing I felt for what I left behind and create space for a sense of groundedness in new soil."